Month: April 2017

Test Pitting in the Avebury Landscape

News from Avebury – FragmeNTs
Test Pitting in the Avebury Landscape

FragmeNTs

Last week, the Living with Monuments team started test pitting* in Avebury, in fields to the north west and the south west of Avebury Henge, in order to gather information about what the landscape might have looked like in the past and how it has been transformed over the millennia.

_DSC8369v2 Archaeologists from the National Trust and the University of Leicester test pitting in the shadow of Silbury Hill ©Mike Robinson

Before the work began, it was assumed that the test pits would essentially show the same thing; however, what they showed instead was how diverse and different the landscape was in the past.

_DSC8427 Archaeologist, Mike, from the University of Southampton recording one of the southern test pits ©Mike Robinson 

Previous understanding of past landscapes in Avebury was based upon John Evans’ work in the 1980s, which has been taken as the general model for the area, but we are now realising that it’s much…

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Unique First World War Battlefield Found Beneath Wiltshire (from Wessex Archaeology) 25 April 2017

Archaeologists working in Wiltshire have identified a unique network of First World War tunnels under Salisbury Plain. The tunnels are part of a First World War battlefield used to train men to fight in and under the trenches of France and Belgium. The soldiers have left the mine galleries deep in the Wiltshire chalk but they have also left their names – over a hundred inscriptions written by soldiers training on Salisbury Plain between 1915 and 1918. The trenches and the tunnels beneath them have been found during archaeological work in advance of new Army housing at Larkhill on Salisbury Plain. Archaeologists have been working alongside specialist engineers and tunnel specialists to investigate the underground battlefield.

First World War grafitti on a chalk block revealed in an amazing 3D viewer; helping to tell the story of  Corporal Lawrence Carthage Weathers, VC

chalk block graffiti_0

Nugents of Antigua – Muriel Foster

Muriel Foster (Ivy Cottage) is remembered fondly in Aldbourne – not least because she used to pay for the children of the village to have a free ride at Scarrots Fair (pictured here with George Scarrott).  Muriel was also a member of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, alongside Miss Emily Sophia Todd (Hampstead Cottage) and Major Arthur Lockyer Ingpen (One Ash).

Muriel Foster was not a Nugent – but both her brother Osbern and her sister Gladys married Nugents!  She was aunt or great aunt to many Nugent nephews and nieces, as well as to Fosters, Fowlers and Robertsons, some of whom lived in Aldbourne, the village she chose as her home.

Find out more about Muriel Foster on the The Nugents of Antigua website

The Larkhill car burial

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper – thinking about archaeology

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper

_MP26354.jpgThere’s a nice piece in the Guardian by Maev Kennedy about the first world war training trenches found by archaeologists at Larkhill. The cultural significance of historic military remains should not be underestimated. They are numerous and varied, and have enormous power to engage people in different ways with events we should never lose touch with.

Untitled-1.jpgWhen I visited the site last year, apart from the neolithic enclosure (of great interest in the context of Stonehenge of course) I was struck by a sports car that seemed to have been entombed whole in the 1930s. It was a sunny, frosty day, and you could make out “Pirelli” on the tyres. Long ago Forbes Taylor filmed a black hearse-like Rolls driving into a grave, watched by black-veiled young women in short black skirts, for a TV programme that featured the Sutton Hoo ship burial. No ritual at Larkhill: Si Cleggett tells…

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Public Art Needs You!

Latest news from Creative Wiltshire. An HLF Collecting Cultures Project to collect and celebrate the best of Wiltshire’s creative talent

Locate – Investigate – Map

Help us to find out more about the public art in Wiltshire.

Creative Wiltshire Public Art graphic image The Public Art Project – help needed to Locate, Investigate, Map

About the project 

The aim of the project is to locate, record and photograph public art, namely artworks made by an artist, arts practitioner or craftsperson and located in publicly accessible spaces and places in Wiltshire. At present very little is known about the whereabouts and extent of public art in the county and the role it plays to enhance the places where we live and work. To volunteer for the project please fill contact Local Studies.

 

We need your help

We need individuals and groups to help us gather data on public art in the community such as location of the item, its condition, what is known of it and a photograph of it in situ. Workshops will be…

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