Author: Aldbourne Archive

Summer Special Download: Conventions and Other Events – Tides of Time (August 2019)

My first visit to Tides of Time this morning, via Twitter (it’s great what a quick search on Aldbourne can produce!). Interesting articles featuring visits to Aldbourne, including the gathering in June 2019.

Here’s what their website says:

Welcome to the online home of The Tides of Time, a Doctor Who fanzine published by the Oxford (University) Doctor Who Society. We publish online and in print. The current editors are James Ashworth, a graduate of Worcester College; and freelance writer, editor and researcher Matthew Kilburn. The Oxford Doctor Who Society emblem is by Francis Stojsavljevic.

https://oxforddoctorwho-tidesoftime.blog/about-the-tides-of-time/ (August 2019)

The Tides of Time – sometimes known without its definite article – has been published by the society since January 1990. This website was founded in July 2010 as an unofficial catalogue for the fanzine, but it has since grown to become the main point of distribution for current issues and an archive of every issue in PDF from the beginning of the run to the present. Every issue is now available online.

https://oxforddoctorwho-tidesoftime.blog/about-the-tides-of-time/ (August 2019)

The Tides of Time

The end of August is approaching – a hot, hard sun (we love you, Neil Cross) or else the cold rain and autumn-apprehending clouds of the legendary English bank holiday weekend. Time for our long-planned summer supplement! The Tides of Time Special Edition Summer 2019: Conventions and Other Events is here, having grown from a few pages which had to be left out of issue 43 into 64 colour pages looking at some of the events our writers have been to recently or in some cases several years ago.

It can be downloaded free of charge in one of two formats:

High-resolution PDF (12Mb)

Low-resolution PDF (2.6Mb)

Features include

Big Finish Twentieth Anniversary

  • A Celebration of Doctor Who Audios. Matthew Kemp at Big Finish Day, 22 June 2019
  • Legacy of the Time War. Dahria Kuyser comments on themes explored in the Big Finish anniversary weekend livestream, July 2019

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Stonehenge and Avebury: An Avebury landowner avows to protect the stones

Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre @HeritageWSHC on Twitter 150819

A recent tweet/FB/Instagram by Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre reminded me of this article (2013 The Heritage Journal), featuring the redoubtable George Brown of Avebury. Shared here as I get stuck into thinking about research for the #RidgewayHistoryTrail.

https://heritageaction.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/stonehenge-and-avebury-an-avebury-landowner-avows-to-protect-the-stones

I have purchased an excellent and indispensible book Walking the Ridgeway, by Steve Davison which suggests an alternative start from the centre of Avebury village; and describes the official start at Overton Hill as ‘not very inspiring’. Each to their own. I have to admit that up to a few years ago, I would have agreed; at the Sanctuary – concrete posts – what’s that all about? So disappointed visiting as a child after watching Children of the Stones and hearing about the Avenue and Sanctuary. However, I’ve been fortunate enough to find out what it is really all about, thanks in part to the helpful information boards installed at the site. As a total fan of Trowel Blazer, Maud Cunnington, I find much to inspire me there; so much, that I’m finding it difficult to move away and start the journey exploring the stretch of the Ridgeway Path as it travels away from Overton Hill. Maud will be much on my mind as we journey past Aldbourne, and towards Foxhill.

http://www.steve-davison.co.uk/ridgeway.html https://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/ridgeway https://www.ridgewayfriends.org.uk

Maud Cunninton Digging Women of Power. Cartoon by Gabe Moshenska
https://trowelblazers.com/maud-cunnington
See also: J. Roberts, “‘That Terrible Woman’: The Life, Work and Legacy of Maud Cunnington” Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine (2002): 46-62. and
M. Pitts 2001. Hengeworld. London: Arrow.

Marcus Rouse

During the Festival of Archaeology it was my privilege to share memories about two of our village #HumansOfArchaeology, Andrew Sewell and Howard Gibbs.  Today seems an appropriate day to recall another gentleman in the village, who many will remember, and whose inexhaustible ingenuity supported many projects:  Marcus Rouse.

In the very earliest days of the ‘Aldbourne Archive’, Marcus was kind enough to offer much advice on photographing objects.  This included our original effort for 3D photography.  The Aldbourne Carnival Crown he made, commissioned by the Cheney family, was our very first project (2005).  Marcus explained the symbols in the metalwork.  Dabchicks, The Square, Bells, and the Cross on the Green, the coloured cord around the base of the metalwork represents the sallies or bell-ropes in the Church Tower.  Hours of fun with a turntable, DIY lighting and a VERY DIY background, and a PowerPoint followed.  I can remember long chats when we bumped into each other around the village, once Marcus was inspired by a project his enthusiasm knew no bounds! Much missed.

Marcus contributed a bell wheel for the exhibition in the Memorial Hall during the 2010 Festival.  He made a wooden cut-out of a bell, to show the relative size of bell and wheel.  He also brought along a bell clapper on wheels; so that small people could safely judge the weight.  As I said, a man of great ingenuity.

One of my prized possessions is an acrylic block shaped like a barn which Marcus presented as a memento of a barn dance celebrating my 40th. The year will remain a mystery!

For the first Aldbourne Festival in 1970, Marcus created a bell foundry on the Green.  There was a photograph of this in a fundraising calendar for 2001 and the Aldbourne Heritage Centre have one of his bells, and a model foundry, on display.  I hope to find time to search through pictures in the Aldbourne Photographic Club collection at the Heritage Centre to find a photo of the man himself.  There’s also a fleeting glimpse of the foundry in the film taken by Moya Dixon during the 1970 Festival

Moya Dixon (original cinefilm 1970. With thanks to Ron Morley and Sam Hutchings for their help digitising and publishing this lovely window on Aldbourne history.
Calendar (2001). One of several created by Maureen Albright as a fundraiser for St Michael’s Church, Aldbourne
Bell founded by Marcus Rouse at Aldbourne Heritage Centre
http://aldbourneheritage.org.uk

I’m putting together a collection of Dabchicks (if anyone has a spare number 39 – April 1997) that would be fab!  Today is an appropriate day to publish these reminiscences following this article by Marcus that I discovered whilst sorting through the collection.

Marcus Rouse Dabchick Magazine October 1996

Howard Gibbs Remembered

Howard Gibbs (1928 – 2010)
‘Aldbourne Archaeologist’, Howard’s interest in the distant past was kindled when he volunteered during excavations at Littlecote in the 1970s. I had many chats with Howard about his research, and the wonderful model of the villa he created (displayed in the Wiltshire Museum, Devizes). His poems always seemed to focus of the heart of our village, and the landscape in which we live. There is also one about a frog that went ‘a-wooing’ – not sure that it should be posted on-line – bit saucy! His archive (possibly including the saucy poem) is now deposited with Aldbourne Community Heritage Group – please contact the Curator for more information)

An obituary for Howard by Bryn Walters and Grahame Soffe can be found in the Association for Roman Archaeology Newsletter (Issue 23)

75th Anniversary of the Council for British Archaeology
ArchaeologyUK #FestivalOfArchaeology #humanofarchaeology

A Boxing Day Discovery

Andrew Sewell (1921 – 2005)
Remembering a gentleman with a life-long love of archaeology, a skill for field walking and a fascination with our village history. Author of many articles and letters, including ‘Aldbourne: the Present Past.’ The highlight of his endeavours being the discovery of the Aldbourne Hoard (now displayed in the Wiltshire Museum, Devizes)

75th Anniversary of the Council for British Archaeology
ArchaeologyUK #FestivalOfArchaeology #humanofarchaeology…

Aldbourne Archive

The Aldbourne Hoard.  Discovered on Boxing Day 1980.  Presented to the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society in March 1982 by Mr C E Elliott-Cohen and Mr A Sewell.  On display in the Roman Gallery at Wiltshire Museum, Devizes.

A

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Easter in Aldbourne

2019 – Photo Credits:
The deliberations of the Easter Bunny and Cross at the pond are from Alison Edmonds.
The glorious sun-rise from Four Barrows Track on Easter morning is from Ros Oswald.
The Duck Race – which was a slow, stately journey given the low water level – Jo Hutchings.

Egg Throwing on the Green 16 April 1990. Picture shows Lesley Smith winning the women’s event. Lesley tells me that the final group for the men’s event had to be moved to the school playing field; since they were running out of range on the Green. This brilliant event, which also included the revival of the Easter Bonnet Parade, was organised by Peter Ludlow and his team in aid of village charities.

A Maiden’s Blush: the first book of Roses

Eureka moment in the Rare Books Room at the British Library!  This post from the Gardens Trust https://thegardenstrust.blog popped into my in-box this morning; just as I was thinking about Ida Gandy and Miss Todd. No real connection with Aldbourne (as far as I can see) but such beautiful drawings that I just had to share! A very accomplished artist.

Also, in Heart of a Village (1975) Ida Gandy did mention that two plants were named after Emily Sophia Todd; one a variety of the Wood-cowwheat (Melampyrum sylvaticum), another a wild rose, Rosa Toddie.

An opportunity for more research, perhaps!

The Gardens Trust

detail of Rosa centifolia, the Bishop Rose

The British Library Rare Books room is not usually the place where people get over-excited, but occasionally there are Eureka moments. Sometimes they’re the result of long patient reference checking when you realise your original hypothesis is true, or ploughing through vast tomes for a good quote to prove a point or grab a reader’s attention and   sometimes they are simply serendipity. Today’s post is one such.

Rosa pendulina, or the Rose without thorns

Following a discussiion in one of the clkasses I teach, I had an idea for a worthy post on how and why women became widely involved in botany in the late 18thc and thought I’d call up a selection of books and magazines by women from the period to see if I could find anything interesting to write about.  They included a couple by an artist…

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