Walrond Family Ancient and Modern

Walrond Memorial in St Michael’s Church, Aldbourne (2022)

I have photographed the Walrond Brothers, Edward and William, many times. Usually at Harvest Festival when their inscriptions are obscured by vegetables and flowers. Or at Christmas when the knitted Nativity figures progress along that handy flat surface. I’ve not yet closely studied their ancient family history, or the connection with the other large memorial inside the church: that of the Goddard family. However, there is this fascinating article on the Aldbourne Community Heritage Group website – Aldbourne Chase Disputes

Last weekend, my friend Peter kindly emailed me this photo of a Walrond family plot in Brighton (having spotted the Aldbourne connection) and it was time for me to start to investigate the family tree. Starting with Robert and Clara Walrond, together with their sons Robert Dudley (b1879) and Francis Hiller (b1882).

With thanks to Peter Turvey who spotted this grave at the Brighton (Woodvale) Cemetery (2022)

Robert and Clara were married in 1873. They had three daughters (Ethel, Hilda, Lilian) then eldest son Robert Dudley. The newly widowed Clara was living with Lilian and her family at the time of the census in 1911.

Robert and Clara’s youngest son Francis died at home of wounds on 15 August 1916. Francis is also buried at Woodvale, Brighton.

Robert Dudley Walrond married Hilda Dorothy Blundstone on 19 June 1909. It looks as though they had three children: Robert Edwin (1910), Karen Dorothy (?) (1912) and William Eric (1915). Robert Edwin Walrond returned to England from Buenos Aires in 1932, giving his address as ‘Aldbourne, Bramcote Road, Putney, SW’. It seems likely that Robert Edwin was returning from his family property in the Argentine.

Article about the late John Fisher – Dabchick April 1993

Robert Dudley Walrond died in 1954, and his funeral took place in St Michael’s Church, Aldbourne. In the Parish Newsletter (July 1954) Robert is described as “the head of the last remaining family descended from that ancient Wiltshire family that included Edward and William, who lived during the reign of Elizabeth I”.

1954 Aldbourne Parish Newsletter – with thanks to Aldbourne Community Heritage Group

Robert Edwin Walrond continued as a benefactor of St Michael’s Church, and was mentioned several times in newsletters until the announcement of his burial (ashes) appeared in April 1965. The family tomb in the churchyard bears the names of Robert Dudley, Robert Edwin, William Eric and his wife Rosemary (nee Larcom), Karen Duras (nee Walrond) and Karen’s only son, Peter.

Aldbourne Churchyard 2022

Past and Present: WI in Aldbourne

100 Years of the Women’s Institute: Resolutions by the Decade – Aldbourne Carnival 2015
Aldbourne in Westminster 1948

If you partake of Facebook, you may like to visit the Aldbourne WI Group. I was browsing recently and followed up an announcement there about the Resolution Selection Results for 2022.

Women and Girls with ASD & ADHD – under-identified, under-diagnosed, misdiagnosed, under-supported

Women and girls presenting with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are going undiagnosed. The NFWI calls on the government and funding bodies to fund research into the female presentation of ASD and ADHD, and for action to be taken to improve the diagnosis process for women and girls, to ensure that they are equipped to better manage these conditions and do not suffer in silence.  The NFWI further calls on WI members to raise awareness within their WIs of the issues facing women and girls with ASD and ADHD.

https://www.thewi.org.uk/campaigns/resolutions/resolution-selection-results-2022

The Women’s Institute is democratic and member-led, and the resolutions process is unique in putting members at the heart of decisions about our campaign activity. Every issue that we campaign on stems directly from a resolution put forward by members and adopted at the Annual Meeting. WI members have a unique opportunity to turn a concern into a national campaign every year, backed by the whole of the WI.

A resolution is a call for change on a current issue in society. Once a resolution has been adopted at the Annual Meeting, the Public Affairs Department turns it into a campaign. Through national and local campaigning, members play a key role in achieving change on important issues.

Read more about our campaigns in our Centenary Report.

https://www.thewi.org.uk/campaigns/resolutions

Honor Liddiard (writing for the Parish News in 1968) recalled that “The WI was formed here in 1918 … On reflection, I think I was the first delegate to go to London from Aldbourne. I was chosen one summer day at Upham House, where we were being entertained by Lady Currie. The meeting I attended was not in the Albert Hall, but at Central Hall Westminster. Reporting on the meeting to our own WI, it may have been nearly fifty years ago, but I was just as nervous as I am speaking today.”

Thanks to the Aldbourne Community Heritage Group sharing this photo on their Facebook page, and those lovely folk who contributed details we know this was the 50th birthday of the Aldbourne WI. Annie Slade (left) and Louisa Stacey cutting the cake.

Ending with a final note about the Women’s Institute and Resolutions, this newspaper cutting reports on a WI meeting in 1937 when members spoke on the resolutions put forward in that year. Click here to read the WI Centenary report published in 2018. Additionally, this document lists all NFWI Mandates from 1918 to 2021.

Aldbourne Coronation Celebrations on 2 June 1953

Once again, proof that the good people of Aldbourne knew how to throw a party! I would love to see photos of the ‘Musical Chairs on Bicycles’. Sadly, at least for the moment, I’ll have to content myself with the write-up about the ‘Ladies XI’ in the Parish Magazine. Somewhere in that photo there is a well known BBC presenter, famous for his Animal Magic. As the Vicar said, ‘it is up to the reader to identify them in the photograph’. The mention of the village pond renovation refers to the creation of the concrete basin, which caused some controversy at the time. The pond went from a natural feature to a ‘little concrete prison’ [Ida Gandy] in 1953. It was modified into a more natural form (as it is today) following the Festival in 1990.

Remember the Worcesters 1939?

I can remember when the Worcesters were stationed in Aldbourne. They were in Powell’s yard, by the Blue Boar. There was a big house there. There was a front entrance from The Green and there was an entrance round the back, then you go up the lane, to the playing field.

John Fisher – Aldbourne Oral History Project 2006

The troops came to Aldbourne. First of all the Worcesters; I don’t quite know where they were stationed apart from Lottage Road. The Harrison’s had a poultry farm, just below the Foundry and they were actually stationed in those chicken huts, which people would probably never believe. They were round the village but, because I was only 11, you don’t take much notice; but I know these men paraded every morning with broomsticks because there were no rifles, and so they paraded and marched up and down the road.

Audrey Barrett – Aldbourne Oral History Project 2006
Aldbourne Parish Magazine October 1939
Cyril Griffiths in the Aldbourne Parish News – April 1983

The accounts book for the Aldbourne Memorial Hall has many entries for receipts and outgoings for soldiers stationed in the village. The two officers mentioned in the following extract were both 67th Field Regiment Royal Artillery.

Aldbourne Memorial Hall Account Book 1939

The regiment left Worcester in the summer of 1939 to camp out near Lyndhurst in Hampshire, then moved in the autumn to Aldbourne in Wiltshire, on the edge of Salisbury Plain. Both were conventionally picturesque places: Lyndhurst was in the middle of the New Forest, and wild ponies often wandered into the streets; Aldbourne was an unspoiled village with the usual accoutrements of church, five pubs, cottages, a green, a duck pond and a purling stream. It might be nice to think that the War Office picked these locations to provide the young recruits with fresh memories of the peaceful and bucolic country they’d be fighting for, but the nearby artillery ranges in both places were the more likely draw.

At Aldbourne the troops learned that in January they would set sail for France, where they’d become part of the British Expeditionary Force, which had been assembling across the Channel since the declaration of war.

Belt, Boots and Spurs – Jonathan Raban https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v39/n19/jonathan-raban/belt-boots-and-spurs

Aldbourne Village Gallery. The story so far – long may it last!

I started a Flickr Gallery in 2008. It now has just over 4,000 photos in it. Flickr has been acquired by something called Smug Mug, and I’ve decided not to add any more photos since there seems to be a risk that the Gallery might disappear; free accounts being a bit vulnerable to that, it would seem.

So here’s a link – enjoy! https://www.flickr.com/photos/aldbournevillagegallery/albums

Many aspects of village life are represented; particularly Carnival and the Beating of the Bounds. If there are any photos or albums you’d like to chat about, please drop me a line, aldbourne.archive@gmail.com

Jo Hutchings – August 2019