Unique First World War Battlefield Found Beneath Wiltshire (from Wessex Archaeology) 25 April 2017

Archaeologists working in Wiltshire have identified a unique network of First World War tunnels under Salisbury Plain. The tunnels are part of a First World War battlefield used to train men to fight in and under the trenches of France and Belgium. The soldiers have left the mine galleries deep in the Wiltshire chalk but they have also left their names – over a hundred inscriptions written by soldiers training on Salisbury Plain between 1915 and 1918. The trenches and the tunnels beneath them have been found during archaeological work in advance of new Army housing at Larkhill on Salisbury Plain. Archaeologists have been working alongside specialist engineers and tunnel specialists to investigate the underground battlefield.

First World War grafitti on a chalk block revealed in an amazing 3D viewer; helping to tell the story of  Corporal Lawrence Carthage Weathers, VC

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Nugents of Antigua – Muriel Foster

Muriel Foster (Ivy Cottage) is remembered fondly in Aldbourne – not least because she used to pay for the children of the village to have a free ride at Scarrots Fair (pictured here with George Scarrott).  Muriel was also a member of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, alongside Miss Emily Sophia Todd (Hampstead Cottage) and Major Arthur Lockyer Ingpen (One Ash).

Muriel Foster was not a Nugent – but both her brother Osbern and her sister Gladys married Nugents!  She was aunt or great aunt to many Nugent nephews and nieces, as well as to Fosters, Fowlers and Robertsons, some of whom lived in Aldbourne, the village she chose as her home.

Find out more about Muriel Foster on the The Nugents of Antigua website

The Larkhill car burial

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper – thinking about archaeology

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper

_MP26354.jpgThere’s a nice piece in the Guardian by Maev Kennedy about the first world war training trenches found by archaeologists at Larkhill. The cultural significance of historic military remains should not be underestimated. They are numerous and varied, and have enormous power to engage people in different ways with events we should never lose touch with.

Untitled-1.jpgWhen I visited the site last year, apart from the neolithic enclosure (of great interest in the context of Stonehenge of course) I was struck by a sports car that seemed to have been entombed whole in the 1930s. It was a sunny, frosty day, and you could make out “Pirelli” on the tyres. Long ago Forbes Taylor filmed a black hearse-like Rolls driving into a grave, watched by black-veiled young women in short black skirts, for a TV programme that featured the Sutton Hoo ship burial. No ritual at Larkhill: Si Cleggett tells…

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Public Art Needs You!

Latest news from Creative Wiltshire. An HLF Collecting Cultures Project to collect and celebrate the best of Wiltshire’s creative talent

Locate – Investigate – Map

Help us to find out more about the public art in Wiltshire.

Creative Wiltshire Public Art graphic image The Public Art Project – help needed to Locate, Investigate, Map

About the project 

The aim of the project is to locate, record and photograph public art, namely artworks made by an artist, arts practitioner or craftsperson and located in publicly accessible spaces and places in Wiltshire. At present very little is known about the whereabouts and extent of public art in the county and the role it plays to enhance the places where we live and work. To volunteer for the project please fill contact Local Studies.

 

We need your help

We need individuals and groups to help us gather data on public art in the community such as location of the item, its condition, what is known of it and a photograph of it in situ. Workshops will be…

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Frederick Horatio Walker Ault

Interesting chap – Mr Ault –  I’ve just passed this and several other original prints over to the Aldbourne Community Heritage Group.  It’s really great to see the photographer’s details on the back of these prints, some of which are very familiar from the digitised copies held by the former Aldbourne Civic Society.  Here’s an article by Dr Martin Graham for the Oxford TimesLifting the Vale (2008)

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Christmas Morning 2014

The Band were out and about this Christmas Morn’ – but sadly I didn’t hear them myself. On Facebook this morning I read that a neighbour heard ‘Silent Night’ in Farm Lane! A wonderful village, and family, tradition. It’s been an honour to help secure and preserve the history of the Aldbourne Band. The Heritage Project was launched at the Upham Road concert in 2013 – the Golden Anniversary at that venue and it seems very fitting that a further celebratory concert will be held there at the end of January 2015.  An American visitor wrote an account of his Christmas morning with the Band during the 1980s – a village tradition at it’s best! Church Musican British Notebook September 1985

Happy Christmas to all!
Christmas Band for Facebook 2014

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